top of page

Want To Learn About ADHD? Here’s What You Should Know — And Important Things You Need To

Updated: Oct 14

Want To Learn About ADHD? Here’s What You Should Know — And Important Things You Need To Avoid

If you’ve ever wondered what ADHD is, how it affects people, or what treatment options exist, this article is for you. We’ll cover everything from how it feels to live with ADHD to how medication can help manage symptoms. We’ll also discuss the differences between ADD and ADHD (and why they’re not the same thing), so by the end of this article you should have all the tools you need to know about this condition.

There’s a lot of ADHD misinformation out there.

ADHD is a common condition that affects millions of people. But it’s important to get accurate information on the condition, because there’s a lot of misinformation out there.

Many people think ADHD is just an issue with kids who can’t sit still in school or follow directions, and they don’t realize that this is just one symptom of a more complex disorder. It’s also common for people to think ADHD only affects boys. Neither of these things are true!

In fact, ADHD usually first appears during childhood or adolescence and often continues into adulthood. And while some people grow out of their symptoms as they get older (known as “late onset”), others continue to experience them throughout their lives—and many adults have never even been diagnosed!

To help clarify some common myths about ADHD and provide you with the tools you need for success with this condition…

The symptoms often overlap between ADHD and other mental health conditions.

Often, the symptoms of ADHD are similar to other mental health conditions.

ADHD is not the same as bipolar disorder, depression, or anxiety. It’s important to remember that these conditions have different symptoms and treatments. If you have any concerns about your diagnosis or treatment plan for ADHD, talk with your doctor about it!

Symptoms vary from person to person.

When it comes to ADHD, the symptoms can vary from person to person.

The symptoms of ADHD can be different for each individual. Also, these symptoms may change over time. For example, a child who struggles with hyperactivity might calm down as they get older and learn how best to control their behavior. Or maybe they were always inattentive but now they’re just more comfortable talking about it!

In addition, the severity of one person’s ADHD symptoms may differ when compared to another person’s. For example, one student may be able to stay focused during math class while another student is easily distracted by his neighbor during the same lesson. In addition, some people find that certain situations make their symptoms worse than others; for example: A student may have no trouble focusing at home but does poorly on tests because he gets nervous about being evaluated by his peers or teachers (a situation which makes him feel anxious).

It’s important not only for you as an individual but also for those around you (like family members) so that everyone understands exactly what you need when trying something new or facing different challenges at work/school etcetera

ADHD isn’t just an issue with kids.

ADHD is a chronic condition that can affect people for their entire lives. It isn’t limited to children, but adults with ADHD may experience similar symptoms as children. These include:

  1. Hyperactivity (fidgeting or squirming)

  2. Impulsivity (speaking without thinking first)

  3. Inability to focus on one thing at a time or finish tasks

The symptoms of ADHD are not the same as ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) — they are different names for the same thing.

  1. The symptoms of ADHD are not the same as ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) — they are different names for the same thing.

  2. ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder, while ADD is a behavioral disorder.

  3. ADHD is a chronic condition that can last into adulthood, while ADD is a short-term condition that usually clears up with time and treatment.

The DSM-5 criteria for diagnosing ADHD has changed and the disorder can now be divided into three subtypes.

The DSM-5 criteria for diagnosing ADHD has changed and the disorder can now be divided into three subtypes. The inattentive, hyperactive and combined subtype each have their own list of symptoms that must be met to receive a diagnosis. The inattentive subtype may be diagnosed if you meet six or more of nine symptoms consistently over the past 6 months including:

  1. Trouble paying close attention to details or making careless mistakes in schoolwork, work or other activities

  2. Difficulty sustaining attention during tasks or play activities

  3. Being easily distracted by irrelevant stimuli

  4. Forgetfulness in daily activities — such as chores, schoolwork or taking care of things that require sustained mental effort

There are both stimulant and non-stimulant medications available to manage ADHD symptoms.

There are both stimulant and non-stimulant medications available to manage ADHD symptoms. Most people with ADHD take one of these two types of medication; however, if you don’t respond well to one type of medication, your doctor may prescribe another.

Stimulant medications are the most common treatment for ADHD because they can help treat not just hyperactivity but also inattentiveness and impulsivity. Some stimulants include methylphenidate (Ritalin), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), amphetamine salt combo (Adderall), lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse), dextroamphetamine Sulfate ER (Dexedrine Spansule) Non-stimulants such as bupropion HCL ER may be prescribed for adults with milder symptoms or children who cannot tolerate stimulants due to side effects.

Executive function coaching is an effective treatment option for adults with ADHD.

Executive function coaching is an effective treatment option for adults with ADHD.

Executive function (EF) skills are the abilities we use to solve problems, plan and organize tasks, manage time and resources, make decisions and control impulses. They’re critical for success in school, work and relationships. Many people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have significant difficulties with EF skills — whether they realize it or not. For example:

  1. People with ADHD often have trouble completing tasks on time because they can’t remember when something needs to be done by or where projects are due.

  2. They may get distracted easily when working on a task (or even while watching TV!) because their minds wander off onto other things they’d rather do instead of what’s right in front of them at that moment in time!

Keep in mind that every person experiences ADHD differently so not all of these things may apply to you.

Keep in mind that every person with ADHD experiences it differently so not all of these things may apply to you.

ADHD is a spectrum disorder, meaning there are many different levels of severity. Some people have no symptoms at all, while others have debilitating symptoms that affect every area of their lives. You may also be on the spectrum for another neurodevelopmental condition like autism or learning disabilities, which makes your experience even more unique and complex!

In addition to being a spectrum disorder, ADHD can look very different in adults than in children (and vice versa). Symptoms will present themselves differently depending on age and other factors like gender or ethnicity – so just because your friend’s hyperactivity level was manageable as a kid doesn’t mean yours will be too!

Conclusion

All in all, the best way to deal with ADHD is to be informed about it. The more you know about this disorder, the better equipped you’ll be to manage your symptoms and live a healthy life. With Revive Therapeutic Services, conducting an ADHD test at home is easy. Remember that if you think you might have ADHD, it’s important not just to talk with your doctor but also seek out additional resources such as support groups or other people who can give advice on how they managed their condition.

6 views0 comments
bottom of page